Leftover Links #12: Hip Hop Articles #2

leftover-links-11-hip-hop-articles

We hope you liked our last instalment of Leftover Links because we have more hip hop articles for your perusal.

It’s that time again where we take a look at some of the leftover links found gathering dust in our bookmark folders. We’ve collated seven articles from the past couple of months involving the various faces of the hip hop sphere, from DJing to sampling.

  1. Zulu Nation Says DJ Kool Herc Did Not Start Hip Hop And Is Misrepresenting The Culture – DJ Kool Herc is one originator that has become almost synonymous with the creation of the culture, but Quadeer “M.C. Spice” Shakur of the Universal Zulu Nation released a statement announcing that Hip Hop did not begin with Herc’s famous party at 1520 Sedgewick Avenue in the Bronx on August 11, 1973. According to Shakur, Herc is a founding father of Hip-Hop, but he has been misrepresenting his role in the founding of Hip Hop on various news outlets. (AllHipHop.com)
  2. Crates to Canvas: The Tour Guide of Perfection – TTK is a Brooklyn-based visual artist who draws inspiration from cover art that he’s catalogued and stored away in his mind, using the vinyl as reference points for his own art. FRANK columnist Ricky Powell asked him to join as a monthly contributor and here, he explains the connection between the sonic and the visual in his column and discusses his artwork inspired by A Tribe Called Quest’s hip hop classic, Midnight Marauders. (FRANK151)
  3. Has Hiphop and Sampling Killed Music?  – Controversial jazz trumpeter Nicholas Payton questions whether hip hop and sampling have killed music, off the back of the lawsuit involving Robin Thicke’s Blurred Lines and Marvin Gaye’s estate and the proposed lack of creativity involved. (Nicholas Payton’s blog)
  4. Marley Marl On The Bridge Wars, LL Cool J And Discovering Sampling – Marley Marl sat down with NPR’s Microphone Check hosts Ali Shaheed Muhammad and Frannie Kelley to tell stories about why the New York City Housing Authority should get a co-producer credit on some of his records and how he and LL Cool J got inspired to make Mama Said Knock You Out. (NPR Music)
  5. De La Soul’s Buhloone Mindstate: A 20th Anniversary Retrospective – On September 21st, 1993, De La Soul released their third LP, Buhloone Mindstate, on Tommy Boy Records. De La Soul and Prince Paul produced yet another magnum opus in the vein of the their first two albums but like their previous efforts it was completely different. Twenty years since its release, it is still a high watermark for Hip-Hop and Dart Adams explained why. (HipHopWired)
  6. The End Of DJing – DJ Zimmie laments the demise of DJing in this frank and honest diatribe against the contributors to the craft’s downfall. Rack City, bitch. (DJ Zimmie)
  7. Exclusive: Rich Medina Talks Most Influential Records – Rich Medina has become quite a familiar name and despite his busy schedule, the DJ/poet found time to chat with Okayafrica contributor Tasha Goldberg about vinyl and influences from around Africa and the diaspora and details eleven of the most influential tracks from his collection. (Okayafrica)

About Luke Alex Davis

Luke Davis is a music producer and editor of music blog Sampleface. In his spare time, he enjoys watching tennis and football and reading.